Tuesday, January 08, 2013

US Open to Total Troop Pullout From Afghanistan




Three days before Afghanistan's president, Hamid Karzai, meets with President Barack Obama in Washington, White House officials said Tuesday that the United States is considering all options, including potentially leaving no troops in Afghanistan beyond 2014 when foreign combat forces are to leave.

The U.S. and Afghanistan are negotiating details of a bilateral security agreement, including the scope of a potential U.S. troop presence, after 2014.

Recent media reports have quoted unnamed U.S. officials as saying President Obama received a recommendation from military commanders to maintain between 6,000 and 20,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan after 2014.

But the reports say the White House is considering a smaller contingent, with as few as 3,000 troops, to train Afghan forces and help prevent Al Qaeda from using the country again as a haven.

Senior Obama administration officials say the question of specific U.S. troop levels is less important than achieving key goals.

Deputy National Security Adviser for Strategic Communications Ben Rhodes said, "The way the president approaches this is not aiming to keep a certain number of troops within Afghanistan.  The objective of the bilateral security agreement negotiations is not to accomplish a number of U.S. troops in a country.  It is to accomplish the two goals of denying a safe haven to Al Qaeda, and training and equipping Afghan national security forces."

Rhodes was asked by reporters whether President Obama would not rule out a force level of no U.S. troops in Afghanistan in favor of conducting counterterrorism operations through other means.  Rhodes replied, "Yes, we wouldn't rule out any option."

He added that Friday's talks between the U.S. and Afghan presidents would not finalize any troop number decision.  Rhodes said Obama will consider all aspects of the situation, including recommendations from U.S. and NATO commander Marine Corps General John Allen.

After the withdrawal of a 30,000-member surge force last year, 68,000 U.S. troops remain in Afghanistan.  Plans call for continuing gradual reductions toward a milestone when Afghan forces assume the full security lead this year.

Recently, the Taliban issued a statement threatening to continue fighting the Afghan government if U.S. forces remain in the country after 2014.

Karzai arrived in Washington on Tuesday and will participate in several activities, including talks with U.S. officials and a visit to wounded U.S. soldiers.

Friday's talks between Obama and Karzai will include U.S. and Afghan delegations, and will be followed by a working lunch and a joint news conference.


-Dan Robinson, VOA